Research Profile

Dr Jacqueline
Parkes

Professor in Applied Mental Health

Faculty of Health and Society

  • BA (Hons),P.G.Diploma, M.Med.Sci, PhD, RMN

    Her responsibilities within this role include leading and co-ordinating the research strategy across all branches of the nursing and midwifery academic teams. Completed funded research projects have evaluated local service provision in school nursing, and district nursing, and the perceived health needs of young people across the county. She has also completed three further none funded pieces of research within the School, which have explored the student nurses perception of the nursing practitioner’s role in rehabilitation healthcare, an evaluation of the newly developed graduate mental health worker role, and as part of a consultation process with academic staff exploring their perception communication processes within the institution. Her conference presentations have included women and self-harm, cultural aspects of mental health care, the evaluation of new roles and ways of working in mental health care, and pedagogical research. She is a reviewer for the Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, and has published  a book chapter on ‘Psychological Health’ in ‘Health Needs Assessment’. Ed A. Crouch & C. Meurier (2005).

    In her consultancy role, she has recently been successful in securing a regional bid for ‘Sectoral Lead for Health & Social Care’ from the ‘Lifelong learning Network for Sustainable Communities’ at the University of Leicester. She is also a member of the Regional Personality Disorder Steering Group, and the Heath and Criminal Justice Steering Group.

    • Forensic mental health Care
    • Rehabilitation and Continuing Care
    • Research Methods
    • Psychological Health and well being
    • Ethical issues and social policy 
    • Service evaluation and review through action research, project management, pedagogical research, rehabilitation nursing, and psychological aspects of health and well-being. 
  • Her current research seeks to explore the nature of psychological distress as expressed by female patients currently residing in secure psychiatric establishments.