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Research Profile

Mrs Alison
Power

Senior Lecturer (Midwifery)

Faculty of Health, Education and Society

  • Alison is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy; an Editorial Board Member of the British Journal of Midwifery; a member of the Centre for the Advancement of Interprofessional Education (CAIPE) Research Group and an Associate Member of the Association for Learning Technology.

    She has a keen interest in Interprofessional Education (IPE), and as Faculty Lead co-ordinates the IPE ‘collaborative curriculum’ involving 15 programmes across the Faculty.  She champions the judicious use of technology in learning and teaching and has presented internationally on the University’s Active Blended Learning teaching approach.

  • Module Leader:

    • MID3026 Becoming a Midwife (level 6)
    • MID2028 Perinatal Mental Health (level 5) (Interim)

    Teaching on:

    • BSc (Hons) Midwifery 3-year full time programme
    • Dissertation Supervision MSc Professional Project
    • Academic Assessor
  • Second year Health and Social Care students’ experiences of Interprofessional Education (IPE) in the university setting (2020)

    • To explore the experiences of current second year students (level 5) to elicit their opinions of their IPE learning in the university setting to date within their subject group
    • To identify perceived gaps in knowledge and understanding which would benefit from engaging with a Faculty-wide bespoke learning package in their final year (level 6) as they prepare for qualification and beyond

    An Audit and Evaluation of a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) for e-learning (2013)

    • To audit and evaluate the effectiveness of a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) in meeting the Northampton Integrated Learning Environment (NILE) Module Minimum Standards
    • To evaluate the experience of student midwives in engaging with a VLE as part of an e-module

    Student Midwives’ experiences of Simulated Learning (2013)

    • To explore student midwives’ experiences of simulated learning in relation to the management of obstetric emergencies.
    • To explore whether student midwives feel their experience of simulated learning is effective preparation for managing obstetric emergencies at the point of registration as a member of the multi-professional team
  • For publications, projects, datasets, research interests and activities, view Alison Power’s research profile on Pure, the University of Northampton’s Research Explorer.

  • Conference Presentations:

    International Network for Health Workforce Education (INHWE) 2nd International Congress of Health Workforce Education and Research.  Theme:  Future Education for Healthcare.  Nicosia 9th – 10th May 2019

    • Presentation ‘Active Blended Learning and Changemaker at the University of Northampton’

    Publications:

    2020

    • Power A, Cameron C (2020) Charting New Courses in Learning and Teaching:  case studies from the PebblePad Community – the pioneers of exceptional learning experiences. (Chapter 17 102-107)

    2019

    • Power A, Wilson A (2019) Creating good habits:  making reflection the norm.  British Journal of Midwifery 27 (6) 387-389
    • Power A, Siddall G, Mansfield S (2019) Pre-registration midwifery education:  is ‘cleverness’ the ‘7th C’?  British Journal of Midwifery 27 (4) 265-267
    • Power A, Wilson A (2019) Mentor, coach, teacher, role model:  what’s in a name?  British Journal of Midwifery 27 (3) 184-187
    • Power A (2019) Interprofessional education: shared learning for collaborative, high-quality care.  British Journal of Midwifery 27 (2) 128-129
    • Power A, Boughen A, Ames C (2019) Out of Africa:  students’ reflections on the personal and professional impact of volunteering.  British Journal of Midwifery 27 (1) 59-61

    2018

    • Power A, Coiffait S (2018) New academic year, new challenges:  Tips for student midwives to maintain motivation and momentum.  British Journal of Midwifery 26 (10) 683-685
    • Power A, Albaradura O (2018) Supporting failing students:  how collaboration is key.  British Journal of Midwifery 26 (9) 615-617
    • Power A, Clapham L (2018) Future-proofing simulation and clinical skills.  British Journal of Midwifery 26 (8) 545-546
    • Power A, Jewell L (2018) Students in practice: the role of the student support midwife.  British Journal of Midwifery 26 (7) 475-477
    • Power A, Underwood J (2018) CPD and revalidation:  theory, practice and lessons from teachers.  British Journal of Midwifery 26 (6) 409-411
    • Power A, Thomas C (2018) Restorative supervision for student midwives:  The professional midwifery advocate in the classroom.  British Journal of Midwifery 26 (5) 344-346
    • Power A, Dakri T, Irwin W (2018) Changemaker:  Preparing student midwives for employability, qualification and beyond.  British Journal of Midwifery 26 (4) 264-266
    • Power A, Lowe J (2018) Perceptions of midwives with visible body art:  OK or no way?  British Journal of Midwifery 26 (3) 185-187
    • Power A, Holland L (2018) Are students ‘empty vessels’, or can previous experience enhance future practice?  British Journal of Midwifery 26 (2) 125-127
    • Power A (2018) Beyond Brexit:  Cross-border collaborations in pre-registration midwifery education.  British Journal of Midwifery 26 (1) 57-59

    2017

    • Power A, Mullan J (2017) Vicarious birth trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder: Preparing and protecting student midwives.  British Journal of Midwifery 25 (12) 799-802
    • Power A, Cole M (2017) Active blended learning for clinical skills acquisition:  Innovation to meet professional expectations.  British Journal of Midwifery 25 (10) 668-670
    • Power A, Murray J (2017) Coping with end-of-year assessments:  A survival guide for pre-registration midwives.  British Journal of Midwifery 25 (8) 531-532
    • Power A, Rea T, Fenton S (2017) Life after death:  The bereavement midwife’s role in later pregnancies.  British Journal of Midwifery 25 (5) 329-331
    • Power A, Murray J (2017) How can universities ‘ASSIST’ student midwives with additional needs to achieve?  British Journal of Midwifery 25 (4) 258-260
    • Power A (2017) Courage, commitment and resilience:  traits of student midwives who fail and retake modules.  British Journal of Midwifery 25 (3) 180-182
    • Power A, Farmer R (2017) Pre-registration midwifery education:  do learning styles limit or liberate students?  British Journal of Midwifery 25 (2) 123-126
    • Power A, Ridge J (2017) What does studying research methods have to do with practice?  Views of student midwives and nurses.  British Journal of Midwifery 25 (1) 59-61

    2016

    • Power A (2016) Experiences and expectations of student midwives entering the final year of their programme of study. British Journal of Midwifery 24 (12) 867-869787-789
    • Power A Grzelak I (2016) University Midwifery Societies: support for student midwives, by student midwives. British Journal of Midwifery 24 (11) 787-789
    • Power A, Davidson S, Patrick K (2016) Being ‘with woman’ in contemporary midwifery practice: One Trust’s response to the Francis Report. British Journal of Midwifery 24 (10) 711-713
    • Power A, Quilter J (2016) Should left-handed midwives and midwifery students conform to the ‘norm’ or practise intuitively? British Journal of Midwifery 24 (9) 656-659
    • Power A, Ewing K (2016) Midwifery preceptorship: The next chapter. British Journal of Midwifery 24 (8) 482-584
    • Power A, Briody P (2016) Preparing for your preceptorship midwifery interview: a student’s guide. British Journal of Midwifery 24 (7) 491-493
    • Power A, Briody P (2016) Clinicians in the classroom: The Matron. British Journal of Midwifery 24 (6) 441-443
    • Power A, Gupta K (2016) Clinicians in the classroom: The Consultant Anaesthetist. British Journal of Midwifery 24 (5) 369-370
    • Power A, Rooth C (2016) Clinicians in the classroom: The Consultant Midwife. British Journal of Midwifery 24 (4) 286-287
    • Power A, Rea T (2016) Clinicians in the Classroom: The Bereavement Midwife. British Journal of Midwifery 24 (3) 219-221
    • Power A (2016) Pre-registration midwifery education: Clinicians in the classroom. British Journal of Midwifery 24 (2) 123
    • Power A (2016) Midwifery in the 21st century: Are students prepared for the challenge? British Journal of Midwifery 24 (1) 66-68

    2015

    • Power A (2015) Welcome to practice: A guide for the first labour ward placement. British Journal of Midwifery 23 (12) 902-903
    • Power A, Clews C (2015) Values-based recruitment and the NHS Constitution: Making sure student midwives meet the brief. British Journal of Midwifery 23 (11) 818-820
    • Power A (2015) Welcome to class: A survival guide for commencing student midwives. British Journal of Midwifery 23 (10) 2-4
    • Power A (2015) Contemporary midwifery practice: art, science or both? British Journal of Midwifery 23 (9) 654-657
    • Power A (2015) What do service users want and who cares? British Journal of Midwifery 23 (8) 594-596
    • Power A, Gordon A (2015) There’s an app for that – but how do we know if it’s a good one? British Journal of Midwifery 23 (6) 442-444
    • Power A, Siddall G (2015) Ensuring practice is based on the best evidence: Masterclass on literature searching. British Journal of Midwifery 23 (5) 356-358
    • Power A, Coulson K (2015) What are OERs and MOOCs and what have they got to do with Prep? British Journal of Midwifery 23 (4) 282-284
    • Power A (2015) LinkedIn: Facebook for professionals? British Journal of Midwifery 23 (3) 196-198
    • Power A (2015) Is Facebook an appropriate platform for professional discourse? British Journal of Midwifery 23 (2) 65-67
    • Power A (2015) Twitter’s potential to enhance professional networking. British Journal of Midwifery 23 (1) 65-67

    2014

    • Power A (2014) What is social media? British Journal of Midwifery 22 (12) 806-807