Staff having a discussion in a workshop

Date & Time: Tuesday 16 June 2020, 13:20-14:10

#LTC2020

Programme:

13:20–13:40 Cracker-Barrel 1st Round

Cracker-barrel 1: How can LinkedIn Learning support student skills development?

Join cracker-barrel 1.

Presenters: Jim Atkinson, HR and Rob Howe, LLS

LinkedIn Learning is a huge library of high-quality online video tutorials. It is free to UoN students and is a key tool to support them in developing their study skills, digital skills, business skills, soft skills and lots more. As a member of staff, come along to this session to share and discuss: How can you best use LinkedIn Learning to develop the required key skills of students studying on your modules? What are the key benefits for you and your students? What might be barriers for students using LinkedIn Learning, and in what ways can the university help them?

Cracker-barrel 2: Why shouldn’t students design their own degrees? Putting students in control of programme design.

Join cracker-barrel 2.

Presenter: Paul Sedgwick, FHES

Universities are always looking for ways of making students more receptive to what they are learning and more engaged and committed to study and yet we tell them what they need to learn and define it by Programme Learning Outcomes. This is fine when they already know what career path they are on but when this is not so, what happens? It is proposed that we should challenge those students to ‘design their own degree’. It doesn’t mean design a programme from scratch, but within the limits of practicality, students should have a completely free choice of the modules which go into their degrees. Come to this session to share your views on: What do we want those students who are not on career-path degrees to learn? Would offering something as radical as this lead to more social inclusion and more participation? Or, would it be off putting to applicants who have been schooled into expecting to be told things? Would doing this count as being ‘socially innovative’?

Cracker-barrel 3: Using radical and extreme collections in Active Blended Learning: risks and rewards.

Join cracker-barrel 3.

Presenters: Daniel Jones and colleagues, FAST

This cracker-barrel session will share experience of using radical and extreme collections to engage with BAME and other minority groups who might be especially impacted by this kind of material. Audience will be invited to discuss and debate on the following questions: What barriers/concerns do you see in using radical/extreme material within your ABL teaching? Can you see advantages in using this material in your teaching, and what would you need to make that work? Thinking especially about digital presentation of this material, how would you think it needs to be framed to students, and to a wider audience (e.g. local Black History associations)?

Cracker-barrel 4: Designing online group work.

Join cracker-barrel 4.

Presenters: Helena Beeson and Richard Byles, LLS, and Hayley Henderson, FBL

Given recent changes in how we interact with students, particularly during a busy term time, it would be useful to have a strategy for managing groupwork. Success in such assignments require a strong team ethic, and this requires time to bond at the start of the process. With the likelihood that campus-based courses continue to run while staff work remotely, along with the evolution of distance learning courses it is important to identify effective approaches to support students who are working remotely. This cracker-barrel session will open up this conversation with the following questions: What could group work sessions look like if they were run entirely online? Which elements of the groupwork process should we emphasise when teaching online and why? How can we use online tools for activities that promote these? How might the success of a groupwork project be impacted without face to face contact?

Cracker-barrel 5: Re-imagining socially responsible learning: A manifesto for change.

Join cracker-barrel 5.

Presenter: Cristina Devecchi, FHES

There is the need for teaching and learning to be shifted from a narrow pedagogical approach focused on instructional considerations, the ‘know how,’ to a focus on ‘know what’ (content) and ‘know-why’ (justification). In doing so, the author puts forward ‘A manifesto for change’ based on three premises: the acknowledgement that dealing with change is not an option but a necessity; universities needs to revisit their goals and missions so as to reformulate their involvement in society; and developing through change. Join this cracker-barrel session to share your views on questions such as: Which values do you think education should nurture in our young people to build a responsible future generation? What do you think a ‘fair’ education should be like? If you were to fulfil the goal that education should be ‘FREE’ (fair, responsible, efficient and effective), what would you do?

13:40–13:50 Transition
(time to join another cracker-barrel session)

13:50–14:10 Cracker-Barrel 2nd Round

Cracker-barrel 1: How can LinkedIn Learning support student skills development?

Join cracker-barrel 1.

Presenters: Jim Atkinson, HR and Rob Howe, LLS

Cracker-barrel 2: Why shouldn’t students design their own degrees? Putting students in control of programme design.

Join cracker-barrel 2.

Presenter: Paul Sedgwick, FHES

Cracker-barrel 3: Using radical and extreme collections in Active Blended Learning: risks and rewards.

Join cracker-barrel 3.

Presenters: Daniel Jones and colleagues, FAST

Cracker-barrel 4: Designing online group work.

Join cracker-barrel 4.

Presenters: Helena Beeson and Richard Byles, LLS, and Hayley Henderson, FBL

Cracker-barrel 5: Re-imagining socially responsible learning: A manifesto for change.

Join cracker-barrel 5.

Presenter: Cristina Devecchi, FHES