Photo of Dr. Sarah Neill

Dr. Sarah Neill

  • Job title: Associate Professor (Children`s Nursing)
  • Department: Health - Child Nursing

General information

Associate Professor Sarah Neill is an academic children’s nurse with over twenty years of experience in higher education. Awarded the role of Associate Professor in Children’s Nursing in 2013, her research centres on the patient experience in child health and children's nursing, with a specific focus on parents’ decision making during acute childhood illness and the development of interventions to support parents. Methodologically her expertise is in qualitative research and, within that, grounded theory.

Sarah is committed to working collaboratively with children & families in research projects. She believes that interventions will only be effective when developed with the people for whom they are intended. Sarah set up a panel of parents with children under 5 years for a research project 5 years ago and now leads this work in collaboration with the lead parents. She also acts as Patient and Public Involvement Lead for the Centre for Family Life with the Institute of Health and Wellbeing at the University of Northampton.

Sarah is keen to further develop patient centred care in the field of child health through research and education in collaboration with colleagues nationally and internationally. Her research constituted part of the REF returns in 2013.

Teaching

Sarah is the course leader for the Masters in Clinical Practice, a part time programme for health care professionals who are seeking to develop a clinical academic career. She also teaches qualitative research on a range of other masters programmes, within Professional Doctorate and discipline based training for PhD students within the School of Health. She also leads a university wide Grounded Theory forum.

Research

Current projects

ASK SNIFF (Acutely Sick Kid Safety Netting Interventions for Families)

Programme of research Associate Professor Sarah Neill co-leads this programme with Professor Monica Lakhanpaul, University College London. This is a collaborative co-production research programme to develop interventions with and for parents to help them identify signs of serious illness in children under 5 years of age. The programme also runs a parent panel to ensure parents’ voices are central at every stage. Please see the programme’s website www.asksniff.org.uk for detailed information.

Child Death Overview Project Associate Professor Sarah Neill is a Collaborator

This project is reviewing child death reporting, implementation of recommendations and impact on child health outcomes in one area of the North West of England in partnership with the local Strategic Clinical Network and University of Central Lancashire. October 2014 - present

Digital Badges - evaluation of psychosocial impact Associate Professor Sarah Neill is the Principal Investigator

This is a collaboration with Makewav.es Digital Badge pioneers, commissioned by NHS England.

November 2015 - present

Completed projects

  • ASK SNIFF research programme completed projects include:
  • ASK SaRA Safety-netting Review and Analysis
  • ASK PIP Parent Information Project
  • ASK SID Safety-net Intervention Development
  • ASK PIP and ASK SID were both NIHR Portfolio projects.

Please see www.asksniff.org.uk for details

Choose Well Insight project Associate Professor Sarah Neill was the Principal Investigator

Commissioned by Nene Clinical Commissioning Group, December 2012 to July 2013, to explore parents decision making about which health services to use for an acutely sick child.

Early Help in Early Years project Associate Professor Sarah Neill was the Principal Investigator

Commissioned by Northamptonshire County Council’s Children & Young People’s Partnership Board, in two phases to establish the feasibility of, and to develop, a universal family assessment document for use with all professionals involved in a child’s care.

Phase 1 Feasibility study October 2012 to November 2012

Phase 2 Development and testing of a universal family assessment tool July 2013 to December 2014

Family Management of Acute Childhood Illness at Home: a grounded theory project

PhD thesis King’s College London

Further information about Associate Professor Sarah Neill’s research publications can be found on ResearchGate: Sarah Jane Neill.

Publications

Jump to: 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

2016

  1. Barchard, F., Sixsmith, J., Neill, S. and Meurier, C. (2016) Understanding courage in the context of nursing. Invited Presentation presented to: Royal College of Nursing (RCN) International Research Conference and Exhibition 2016, Edingburgh, 06-08 April 2016.

2015

  1. Neill, S. (2015) Defining 'family' when a child is acutely ill at home. Paper presented to: 12th International Family Nursing Conference, Odense, Denmark, 18-21 August 2015.
  2. Redwood, T., Neill, S., Church, S. and Spencer, M. (2015) Early help in early years: developing a universal assessment tool. Paper presented to: 12th International Family Nursing Conference, Odense, Denmark, 18-21 August 2015.
  3. Neill, S., Lakhanpaul, M., Roland, D. T., Jones, C., Palmer-Hill, S. and Bayes, N. (2015) Effective safety netting: an important contribution to avoiding preventable deaths. Paper presented to: Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) Annual Conference 2015, Birmingham, UK, 28-30 April 2015.
  4. Neill, S., Jones, C. H. D., Lakhanpaul, M., Roland, D. T. and Thompson, M. J. (2015) Parent’s information seeking in acute childhood illness: what helps and what hinders decision making? Health Expectations. 18(6), pp. 3044-3056. 1369-7625.
  5. Neill, S. (2015) Social influences on parents' health service use when their child is sick: barriers to timely treatment? Paper presented to: Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) Annual Conference 2015, Birmingham, UK, 28-30 April 2015.

2014

  1. Redwood, T., Neill, S. and Church, S. (2014) Developing a universal family assessment tool. Paper presented to: UK Association of Chief Children's Nurses (ACCN) and Young People's Nursing International Conference: Building the Evidence for Best Practice, Jersey, 04-05 September 2014.
  2. Neill, S. and Coyne, I. (2014) Felt or enacted criticism: its role in parents' decision making in differing contexts and communities. Paper presented to: UK Association of Chief Children's Nurses (ACCN) and Young People's Nursing International Conference: Building the Evidence for Best Practice, Jersey, 04-05 September 2014.
  3. Jones, C. H. D., Neill, S., Lakhanpaul, M., Roland, D., Singlehurst, H. and Thompson, M. (2014) Information needs of parents for acute childhood illness: determining 'what, how, where and when' of safety netting using qualitative exploration with parents and clinicians. BMJ Open. 4(1) 2044-6055.
  4. Neill, S. and Hughes, J. (2014) Learning from service users: how do parents of young children want services to change? Paper presented to: Redesigning Paediatric Services - SBK Healthcare Event, Manchester, 16 September 2014.
  5. Neill, S., Jones, C. H. D., Lakhanpaul, M., Roland, D. T. and Thompson, M. J. (2014) Parents’ help-seeking behaviours during acute childhood illness at home: a contribution to explanatory theory. Journal of Child Health Care. 1367-4935. (In Press)
  6. Neill, S., Lakhanpaul, M., Thompson, M., Jones, C. H. D. and Roland, D. (2014) Safety netting in acute childhood illness: empowering families and improving safety. An overview of the ASK SNIFF Research Programme. Paper presented to: UK Association of Chief Children's Nurses (ACCN) Children's and Young People's Nursing International Conference: Building the Evidence Base for Practice, Jersey, 04-05 September 2014.
  7. Neill, S. (2014) Social influences on parents help seeking in acute childhood illness at home. Paper presented to: Mark Allen Publishing Journal of Health Visiting Study Day, Birmingham, 06 June 2014.
  8. Neill, S. (2014) Social influences on parents help seeking in acute childhood illness. 'My child is ill': developing an understanding of what parents do and why? Paper presented to: National Institute for Health Research Northwest London Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (NIHR CLAHRC) Autumn Collaborative Learning Event, London, 05 November 2014.

2013

  1. Conquest, R., Cremonesini, L. and Neill, S. (2013) Bronchiolitis: treatment in the community. Practice Nursing. 24(7), pp. 330-334. 0964-9271.
  2. Neill, S., Shang, C., Thompson, M. and Lakhanpaul, M. (2013) Developing safety netting information for parents: reviewing the literature on effectiveness. Paper presented to: Royal College of Nursing (RCN) Annual International Nursing Research Conference, Belfast, 20-22 March 2013.
  3. Redwood, T. and Neill, S. (2013) Diagnosis and treatment of asthma in children. Practice Nursing. 24(5), pp. 222-229. 0964-9271.
  4. Neill, S., Jones, C. H. D., Lakhanpaul, M., Roland, D. T. and Thompson, M. (2013) Parents' use of safety netting information in acute childhood illness: what helps, what hinders? Paper presented to: 6th Europaediatrics Congress held jointly with the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH), Glasgow, UK, 05-08 June 2013.
  5. Jones, C. H. D., Neill, S., Lakhanpaul, M., Roland, D. T. and Thompson, M. (2013) Safety netting behaviour of primary healthcare professionals for acutely sick young children: a qualitative study. Paper presented to: 6th Europaediatrics Congress held jointly with the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH), Glasgow, UK, 05-08 June 2013.
  6. Roland, D., Jones, C., Neill, S., Thompson, M. and Lakhanpaul, M. (2013) Safety netting in healthcare settings: what it means and for whom? Archives of Disease in Childhood: Education and Practice Edition. 99(2), pp. 48-53. 1743-0585.
  7. Neill, S., Cowley, S. and Williams, C. (2013) The role of felt or enacted criticism in understanding parent's help seeking in acute childhood illness at home: a grounded theory study. International Journal of Nursing Studies. 50(6), pp. 757-767. 0020-7489.
  8. Jones, C. H. D., Neill, S., Lakhanpaul, M., Roland, D., Singlehurst, H. and Thompson, M. (2013) The safety netting behaviour of first contact clinicians: a qualitative study. BMC Family Practice. 14(140) 1471-2296.
  9. Hirst, S. and Neill, S. (2013) Treatment of acute otitis media in childhood. Practice Nursing. 24(8), pp. 407-410. 0964-9271.

2012

  1. Neill, S. and Carter, B. (2012) 'Do I, don't I ask for help?': The perpetual dilemma of parents whose children are ill at home. Journal of Child Health Care. 16(4), pp. 317-319. 1741-2889.
  2. Burrows, M., Neill, S., Redwood, T., Corr, S. and Lakhanpaul, M. (2012) Exploring the differential understanding in language used by health care professionals and parents when describing acutely sick children. Paper presented to: Royal College of Nursing (RCN) Joint Children and Young People Conference and Exhibition: Making the Principles of Nursing Practice Work for Children and Young People, Leeds, 12-13 October 2012.
  3. Burrows, M., Neill, S., Redwood, T., Corr, S. and Lakhanpaul, M. (2012) Parent and healthcare professional use of language: a literature review. Poster presented to: Royal College of Nursing (RCN) Joint Children and Young People Conference and Exhibition: Making the Principles of Nursing Practice Work for Children and Young People, Leeds, 12-13 October 2012.

2011

  1. Neill, S., Robinson, L., Fernando, M., Thompson, M. and Lakhanpaul, M. (2011) Collaborative research with parents: working together to get it right! Paper presented to: Australian College of Children and Young People's Nurses (ACCYPN) Inaugural Conference, Sydney, Australia, 19-21 October 2011.
  2. Neill, S., Thompson, M. and Lakhanpaul, M. (2011) Developing safety netting information for parents: first steps. Paper presented to: Australian College of Children and Young People's Nurses (ACCYPN) Inaugural Conference, Sydney, Australia, 19-21 October 2011.
  3. Neill, S. and Cowley, S. (2011) Felt or enacted criticism theory - a contribution to the understanding of parents' decision making in acute childhood illness at home. Paper presented to: Australian College of Children and Young People's Nurses (ACCYPN) Inaugural Conference, Sydney, Australia, 19-21 October 2011.

2010

  1. Neill, S. (2010) Containing acute childhood illness within family life: a substantive grounded theory. Journal of Child Health Care. 14(4), pp. 327-344. 1367-4935.
  2. Neill, S. and Cowley, S. (2010) Felt or enacted criticism theory - a contribution to the understanding of parents' decision making in acute childhood illness at home. Paper presented to: International Congress on Pediatric Academic Nursing, Berne, Switzerland, 3-4 June 2010.
  3. Callery, P. and Neill, S. (2010) The evidence base for children's nursing practice. In: Glasper, A. and Richardson, J. (eds.) A Textbook of Children's and Young People's Nursing. 2nd ed. Edinburgh: Elsevier. pp. 193-202.

2009

  1. Neill, S. (2009) Containing acute childhood illness within family life. Paper presented to: University of Northampton Research Conference, Northampton, UK, April 2009. Also presented at: RCN Children and Young People Conference, Liverpool, September 2009.

2008

  1. Neill, S. (2008) Acute childhood illness at home: family experiences and the implications for primary care professionals. Poster presented to: European Academy of Paediatrics, Nice, France, October 2008.
  2. Neill, S. (2008) Containing acute childhood illness within family life: a grounded theory. Paper presented to: European Academy of Paediatrics, Nice, France, October 2008.
  3. Neill, S. (2008) Family management of acute childhood illness at home: a grounded theory study. Doctoral thesis. Kings College, London.

2007

  1. Neill, S. (2007) Grounded theory sampling: 'whole' family research. Journal of Research in Nursing. 12(5), pp. 435-443. 1744-9871.
  2. Chambers, M., Walmsley, J. and Neill, S. (2007) The context of care in surgical nursing. In: Chambers, M. A. and Jones, S. (eds.) Surgical Nursing of Children. Edinburgh: Butterworth Heinemann. pp. 1-13.
This list was generated from NECTAR on Tue Jul 26 01:37:15 2016 BST.

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